Blog items from Living Soils

Blog items from Living Soils

  • Higher yields feeding Bloom2 weekly

    We have run a few trials and the results show that a weekly dose of Bloom2 results in slightly higher yields (in the range of 5-10%) compared to bi-weekly.
  • Introducing Malted Barley Powder!

    MBP is barley that has been sprouted and then dried and powdered. The malted barley we use is certified organic from barley grown in the South West of England.
  • Our Bloom mix featured on My Home Farm

    This week our Bloom mix was tested on My Home Farm: a blog about country living, smallholding and a couple’s sustainability journey.
  • Why 4:20 is Associated with Cannabis

    Cannabis smokers and non-smokers alike recognise April 20 or 4:20 as a national holiday for cannabis culture, but few actually know how the date go...
  • The many benefits of insect frass for your plants

    Insect frass is a brilliant fertiliser and biostimulant for use in rooting, vegetative and flowering stages. Made from insect exoskeletons and exc...
  • The value of Mycorrhizal fungi in soil

    What are Mycorrhizae? The term mycorrhizae describes the mutually beneficial (symbiotic) relationship between specialised soil fungi and the roots ...
  • Why Living Soils is a ‘peat-free’ company

    Peat bogs act as a huge carbon storage system. The harvesting of peat releases massive amounts of carbon into the atmosphere
  • Spend time outside to combat 'the January blues'

    The cheerful, brightly-lit festive season is over and the days (in the UK at least) are generally cold and grey; you’re forced to have the light on...
  • What it means to be a carbon neutral company

    Just thought we would update everybody on what carbon neutral is, and why we have decided to become carbon neutral. In order to become carbon neutr...
  • What does living soil actually mean?

    Until now most of us have not managed our soils with biology in mind; the life in soils requires the same attention as above-ground biodiversity. ...
  • What happens to your soil in Winter?

    It is generally accepted that once soil temperatures drop below 7°C, biological activity slows to a crawl, and the soil and all its life forms hibe...
  • Worm farming in winter

    Worms thrive when the outside temperature is between about 55 and 80 degrees F. (12 to 26 C.). When the air begins to turn colder, the worms get s...